Archive for July, 2012

Today’s Advertiser

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Today’s photo was taken from the Suffolk County Almshouse Cemetery near Yaphank, New York.

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Suffolk County Almshouse Cemetery

 

I didn’t have much time for sightseeing today but I happened to spot this cemetery as I was entering the Long Island Expressway near Yaphank, New York.   I drove back later in the day to take a look.  It is the Suffolk County Almshouse Cemetery which according to the information board, provided internments from 1871 – 1953.  The poor of Suffolk County who lived at the Almshouse were provided with a simple burial upon their becoming deceased.  A stone with a number was placed overhead.

I think this is the most organized cemetery I’ve ever witnessed.  There are exactly 1000 burials within the main fenced area.  20 rows of 50 markers each.

There is a smaller fenced area with only 13 stones.  A few of them have names as well.  This sort of reminded me of my visit to the Wood County Lunatic Asylum in Ohio.

 


Presidential tour of Manhattan: Part II

Last Sunday I took a walking tour of Manhattan of various presidential homes and such.  You can only do so much walking in one day.  Today I picked up where I left off last week.  My first stop today was at the Calvary Church at the corner of Park Avenue and 21st Street.  Future President Chester Arthur was married here in 1859.  Theodore Roosevelt also supposedly attended here as a youth when the family lived nearby.

I’ve walked past Union Square several times but never taking the time to check out the monuments inside.  This one is of Lincoln.

Washington gets prominence however.

Cooper Union was where Abraham Lincoln gave a speech in February 1860 where he made the case against the expansion of slavery in the new territories.  It is considered by some scholars to be one of his most important speeches and responsible for his becoming the Republican nominee for president later that year.  Other future presidents have spoken here as well.

The fifth president, James Madison died here 55 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence.  He was living at the home of his daughter here at 63 Prince Street on July 4, 1831 when he died, having sold off Highland years previous.  The home here was moved in the 1920’s to another site and shortly thereafter was destroyed.  Sad that it wasn’t preserved.

Trinity Church is where George Washington worshiped while serving as President in New York, including an inaugural day service.  This church has a lot more history including serving as a place of refuge for the workers at the nearby World Trade Center Site in the aftermath of its destruction.

Continuing down Broadway I came across this marker quiet accidentally, affixed to a large commercial building.  This would be a major New York City tourist attraction if it had been preserved.  I wonder how many million people have walked past and never noticed.

My final stop was my second time visiting Fraunces Tavern.  Last year I arrived too late to take a tour of the museum but did have a couple beers in the downstairs working tavern.  This is where George Washington bade farewell to his officers at the end of the Revolutionary War before heading off to Mount Vernon.  The building is somewhat original, but was altered over the years and in the early 1900’s re-altered to appear what it may have looked like when Washington visited.  There were no photographs so it’s a guess at best.

 


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Today’s Advertiser

There was no advertiser today. If you would like to have your business advertised on this site and in the form of a car magnet, click on the “unique advertising opportunity” tab above for more details. There are many dates available in 2012. Each day will feature one unique advertiser.

Today’s photo was taken from Conference House Park in Staten Island, New York, site of a 1776 conference between the British and Americans which proved unsuccessful.

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Nature in Staten Island

After the disappointment at the Swamp White Oak Forest I went to visit the High Rock Park Preserve, also on Staten Island.

It rained just after I arrived and I retreated to my car until it let up 1o minutes or so later.

This is a swamp.

I also made a brief visit to the William T. Davis Wildlife Refuge.  There was a small trail with little to see.